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Cherokees use technology to teach traditional language

Now the Cherokees can say "There's an app for that." A specially designed keyboard allows students to type the language.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Joseph Erb, helps out students Cambria Bird, left, and Lauren Grayson, right, in the fifth grade class of the Cherokee Nation Immersion School in Tahlequah, Okla., Cherokee children are asking for iPods and iPhones for Christmas this year, and their parents are having a much tougher time saying no than one might expect. Nearly two centuries after a Cherokee silversmith named Sequoyah developed a system of symbols for each syllable spoken by the Cherokee, the tribe's written language has become available on iPhone and iPods.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Joseph Erb demonstrates the iPhone at the Cherokee Nation Immersion School in Tahlequah, Okla., Cherokee children are asking for iPods and iPhones for Christmas this year, and their parents are having a much tougher time saying no than one might expect. Nearly two centuries after a Cherokee silversmith named Sequoyah developed a system of symbols for each syllable spoken by the Cherokee, the tribe's written language has become available on iPhone and iPods.