Discuss as:

Scientists place tracking bands on legs of peregrine falcon chicks as their parent flies nearby

Here's an uncommonly close look at a peregrine falcon (the world's fastest animal):

Ben Margot / AP

"Dapper Dan", a male peregrine falcon, keeps watch as he circles the 33rd floor of the Pacific Gas & Electric building as scientists from the University of California Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group affix leg bands on three baby peregrine falcons Thursday, April 28, 2011, in San Francisco. Each young falcon will get a band on each leg. One band is the normal U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service bird band which contains a phone number to call in the event someone finds a peregrine. The second band is a visual identification band that can be read from a distance with binoculars.

Ben Margot / AP

"Dapper Dan", with the Bay Area beyond.

Ben Margot / AP

Glenn Stewart, right, director of the University of California Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group, places a band on one of three baby peregrine falcons as it is held by Teague Scott, a UC Santa Cruz environmental studies student, near the edge of the 33rd floor of the Pacific Gas & Electric building Thursday, April 28, 2011, in San Francisco.

Ben Margot / AP

A three week old peregrine falcon is banded by University of California Santa Cruz Predatory Bird Research Group scientists.

For more about peregrine falcons, here's the wikipedia article.