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Neon light craftsmen bend glass tubes in England

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Neon artist Chris Bracey puts the finishing touches to the artwork "Heart of The World", a local community piece designed by East London artist Sally Labern on May 16, 2011 in London, England. He has been making neon signs and artworks for 38 years, succeeding his father in running the family business. His pieces have featured in many famous advertising campaigns, shops, movies and TV series. Pieces are either commissioned for specific purposes, or designed as bespoke creations that go on to be sold in art galleries worldwide, often to celebrity buyers.

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Neon artist Chris Bracey puts the finishing touches to the artwork "Heart of The World."

Matthew Lloyd / Getty Images

Neon artist Chris Bracey poses amongst his creations in the "Red Shed" on May 16, 2011 in London, England. He has been making neon signs and artworks for 38 years, succeeding his father in running the family business.

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Neon sign maker Nick Ellwood of Ellwood Signs works on bending letters into shape on May 16, 2011 in London, England. He has been making neon signs for 27 years, following in his fathers footsteps. The lettering is shaped over a hot flame, blowing into the end ensures the tube does not collapse. The pipes are filled with argon gas and capped with transformers which pass a high voltage electric current through the tube, causing the gas to light up.

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Neon sign maker Bill Ellwood of Ellwood Signs works on bending letters into shape on May 16, 2011 in London, England. He has been making neon signs for over 50 years, with his son now following in his fathers footsteps.

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Neon sign maker Bill Ellwood holds a new sign, now reading Budweiser.