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Ash falls on Iceland as Grimsvotn volcano erupts

Brynjar Gauti / AP

A member of a rescue team checks on a farmer near to Kirkjubaearklaustur, approx. 260 km from Reykjavik, Iceland, Monday, May 23, 2011. A dense cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano was being blown toward Scotland Monday, forcing two airlines to cancel their flights, U.S. President Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland and carriers across Europe to fear a repeat of the huge disruptions that stranded millions of passengers a year ago.

Vilheldm Gunnarsson / EPA

Picture taken on 23 May 2011 at around 10:00 AM GMT shows a man cleaning his car from volcanic ashes in the village of Kirkjubaejarklaustur, in the south of Iceland. Airspace over Iceland was closed 23 May 2011 after the North Atlantic country?s most-active volcano continued to spew ash. The plume above the Grimsvotn volcano was Monday estimated to be between 8-10 kilometres, the Icelandic Meteorological Office said. The volcano began to erupt 21 May 2011, and the plume was initially more than 20 kilometres high.

Brynjar Gauti / AP

Farmers Thormar Eller and Henny Hrund go to check their livestock as an ash cloud is seen in background, near Kirkjubaearklaustur, approx. 260 km from Reykjavik, Iceland, Monday, May 23, 2011. A dense cloud of ash from an Icelandic volcano was being blown toward Scotland Monday, forcing two airlines to cancel their flights, U.S. President Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland and carriers across Europe to fear a repeat of the huge disruptions that stranded millions of passengers a year ago.

Here's a story about the type of ash created by this volcano.