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Thai attempt to protect popular beach from future tsunami with wooden fence

Barbara Walton / EPA

Foreign tourists stroll at the waters' edge passing a wooden fence of stakes dug deep into the sand in an attempt to form a barricade against the damage of surging waves, on the resort island of Phuket, southern Thailand, June 11. Post-tsunami, development at the seas' edge is booming once again, despite high losses of lives and business of those who lived, holidayed and built shops on the sea's edge, in Phuket and neighboring provinces struck by the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami. Shops, restaurants and hotels have returned in force despite the risks, and creep ever closer to the edge of the Andaman Sea.

Barbara Walton / EPA

Thai and Burmese labourers, erect a fence hammering wooden stakes deep into the sand at night, as they attempt to form a barricade against the damage of surging waves, to protect sea side restaurants filled with tourists, on the resort island of Phuket, southern Thailand, June 10. This picture released June 11.

I hope this is effective in the event of another tsunami in Phuket, but after witnessing the power of the Boxing Day tsunami in Thailand and the recent tsunami in Japan, I have to wonder if wood buried deep into the ground would have much impact.

If you need a reminder of the incredible power of the earthquake-generated waves, revisit the Nightly News piece below on the disaster in Japan.

Finally, you can read more on the latest happenings in Japan here and on msnbc.com's World Blog.

The epicenter of the quake was 81 miles east of Sendai, Japan. The temblor triggered a tsunami that swept away everything in its path and triggered alerts across the Pacific Basin. ITV's Paul Davies reports.