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Flag Day and the story of the Star-Spangled Banner

Old glory marks her 234th birthday today, June 14. In honor of Flag Day in America, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History has shared an image with us that we'd like to pass along to you.

Photo courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Amelia Fowler, a professional flag restorer, stands next to the American flag she was hired to preserve with a team of needlewomen in 1914. This very flag can be seen on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

According to the Smithsonian:

 

In the summer of 1813, Mary Pickersgill was contracted to sew a 30 x 42–foot garrison flag for Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. That flag later became known as the Star-Spangled Banner, the very flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write what later became the national anthem. The flag remained the private property of the commander of Fort McHenry, Lieutenant Colonel Armistead's widow, Louisa Armistead, his daughter Georgiana Armistead Appleton and his grandson Eben Appleton for 90 years.

In 1912, the Star-Spangled banner was donated to the Smithsonian with the intention to “present the flag to an institution where it could conveniently be seen by the public and where it would be well cared for.” In 1914, the Smithsonian Institution hired Amelia Fowler, a professional flag restorer, to preserve the flag.

 

You can visit the Smithsonian website to learn how the flag landed on display at the museumbrush up on your American History or explore an interactive of the flag Pickersgill made.

Library of Congress

Just about 100 years ago, this poster was created to celebrate the 140th aniversary of the flag. The poseter shows a man raising the American flag, with a minuteman cheering.