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Iraqis deal with electricity shortage with generators, improvised wiring

This sight is becoming common in countries with weak power infrastructure.

Related: Albanians tap into power grid

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

People pass a generator store on a street on July 25, 2011 in Baghdad, Iraq. Despite a recent doubling of the megawatts of electricity available to Iraqis, many people still only receive a few hours of electricity a day from the national grid and therefore have to depend on generators and other private sources of electricity. With more homes owning computers, televisions, refrigerators and air conditioners there is an increased demand for electricity, especially in the scorching summers. The lack of dependable electricity has been one of the main sources of demonstrations against the government. As the deadline for the departure of the remaining American forces in Iraq approaches, Iraqi politicians have been increasingly pressured to  give a final decision about extending the mandate for a small U.S. military presence beyond the end of the 2011 deadline.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Over 100 electric boxes connect homes in a building to a collective generator in a poor neighborhood on July 25, in Baghdad, Iraq.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

A man walks under a tangle of wires connecting homes to a collective generator in a poor neighborhood on July 25 in Baghdad, Iraq.