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Grand Central Terminal is eerily calm before the storm

According to the Metro Transit Authority, the ridership for Grand Central Terminal in 2010 was 41,903,210. If all days had equal ridership in a year, that would be 114,803 people per day. I'd say this scene is a stark contrast to what one would see on a normal day. See more from NBC's Harry Smith below.

Update 10:02 p.m. ET: msnbc.com photojournalist Jonathan Woods visited Grand Central tonight to document its eerie state. We've replaced the (very cool) MTA handout picture with his frames. Jon has filed a number of posts today, including shots from Upper Manhattan hurricane preparations and a picture of a cruise ship leaving New York Harbor.

Jonathan D. Woods / msnbc.com

Grand Central Terminal is deserted in New York City on Aug. 27. Metro North has suspended service and Amtrak is running on a reduced schedule due to Hurricane Irene.

Jonathan D. Woods / msnbc.com

Aside from Metro North Police and a handful of employees, Grand Central Terminal sits vacant ahead of Hurricane Irene's landfall in New York on Saturday, Aug. 27. Heeding New York City Mayor Bloomberg's warnings and left with nearly all mass transit offline, streets are nearly empty.

Jonathan D. Woods / msnbc.com

The usually busy schedule board is blank since the New York area's transit system has been shut down starting Saturday.

Jonathan D. Woods / msnbc.com

Pedestrians walk in the rain outside Grand Central Terminal, some of the few still out on city streets.

Video: Harry Smith with NBC's reports on New York City's iconic locations as the city awaits the hurricane's arrival.