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Texas drought could threaten endangered species

We have PhotoBlogged recently about the Texas drought. Scientists at the National Fish Hatchery & Technology Center, in San Marcos, Texas, have a plan to do something about it.

As AP reports:

LUBBOCK, Texas - Federal officials are readying plans to evacuate a small number of endangered species in Texas as a severe drought lowers water levels and threatens the survival of rare wildlife in the state's huge ecosystem.

Months with almost no rain have caused water levels to drop by half or more in many rivers, lakes and other bodies of water, including springs in the central Texas Hill Country that are the only remaining habitat for populations of small fish, amphibians and other creatures. If the water continues to drop sharply, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials are preparing to net up large samples from the springs to take to a hatchery for preservation.

Eric Gay / AP

Texas Blind Salamanders, an endangered species, are seen at the National Fish Hatchery & Technology Center, in San Marcos, Texas. As rivers and lakes are being sucked dry across drought-stricken Texas, wildlife experts are considering a move to new waters to save some of the state's endangered fish.

Eric Gay / AP

A tour boat is seen at San Marcos Springs, in San Marcos, Texas.

Eric Gay / AP

A San Marcos salamander, an endangered species, is measured for research at the National Fish Hatchery & Technology Center, in San Marcos, Texas.