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US Army soldiers look for Taliban fighters from mountaintop outpost in Afghanistan

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U.S. Army soldiers from the 2-27th Infantry Regiment work out at Observation Post Mustang on September 2, 2011 in Kunar Province, Afghanistan.

John Moore / Getty Images

U.S. Spc. Joseph McInnis from the 2-27th Infantry Regiment works out at Observation Post Mustang. The area, in the Hindu Kush mountains in northeastern Afghanistan near the Pakistan border, is considered a major infiltration route by Taliban fighters coming across from Pakistan and has seen some of the heaviest fighting of the war.

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U.S. Army soldiers from the 2-27th Infantry Regiment eat dinner inside Observation Post Mustang.

John Moore / Getty Images

U.S. Army Pfc. Clarke Lazaga, 20, burns outhouse sewage with diesel fuel at Observation Post Mustang.

John Moore / Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers look towards nearby Taliban positions from Observation Post Mustang.

John Moore / Getty Images

Soldiers pull a bobcat tractor out of the mud at their mountaintop position on September 2.

John Moore / Getty Images

U.S. Army PV2 Cody Hesock looks for Taliban fighters through an infrared scope from Observation Post Mustang on September 2.

 See more Afghanistan images in our slideshow:  "Afghanistan: Nation at a crossroads"

A multimedia piece on U.S. Army Soldiers from Troop C, 1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, Task Force Bandit, fight and live at Observation Post Mustang on the border of Pakistan in eastern Afghanistan's Kunar Province. At the remote base 6,500 feet up in the Hindu Kush Mountains, the Soldiers have the task of providing security for the Afghans and Americans living in the valleys below. (Multimedia by U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell, 210th MPAD). Produced by Staff Sgt. Mark Burrell.