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Abandoned sites in Libya hold unguarded weapons

Scott Peterson / Getty Images Contributor

Peter Bouckaert, the emergencies director of Human Rights Watch, examines anti-tank mines hidden in a peach orchard as Libyans examine unguarded weapons stockpiles from which sophisticated SA-24 and other shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) have disappeared on September 7, 2011 in Tripoli, Libya. Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) is trying to secure sites where loyalist forces of former Libyan leader Moammar Ghaddafi shifted ordnance away from military bases, to protect it from NATO airstrikes. The missing SAMs have raised concerns about the weapons falling into the hands of Al Qaeda in the Maghreb or regional rebel groups.

Scott Peterson / Getty Images Contributor

Libyans examine an unguarded weapons stockpile from which sophisticated SA-24 and other shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) have disappeared on September 7, 2011 in Tripoli, Libya. Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) is trying to secure sites where loyalist forces of former Libyan leader Moammar Ghaddafi shifted ordnance away from military bases, to protect it from NATO airstrikes. The missing SAMs have raised concerns about the weapons falling into the hands of Al Qaeda in the Maghreb or regional rebel groups.

Francois Mori / AP

The label of munitions marked incendiary charges gelatination powder, is seen inside a former Gadhafi Military base in Abu Shweicha, outskirts of Al Ajaylat, 120 km west of Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. Libya Rebels have located warehouses housing large quantities of munitions, protective gear and weapon components.

Francois Mori / AP

Boxes of munitions are piled high inside one of the 5 warehouses as Libyan rebels check inside a former Gadhafi Military base in Abu Shweicha, outskirts of Al Ajaylat, 120 km west of Tripoli, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. Former rebels say they've taken some ammunition for the fight against supporters of Moammar Gadhafi, but U.S. officials and others express fears the weapons could fall into the wrong hands. The country's new leaders, who are struggling to establish a government, have failed to secure many of the caches, making them free game for looters, former rebel fighters or anyone with a truck to carry them away.

Full story: Missing weapons from Libya arms caches raise fears.

Libya previously on PhotoBlog.