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More Afghan women learning to read since Taliban's ouster

Adek Berry / AFP - Getty Images

Afghan teacher Meher Afroza, right, teaches the Koran at an Islamic school in Kabul on Sept. 4. Women's rights in Afghanistan risk being forgotten as international troops withdraw and the government struggles for a peace deal 10 years after the Taliban were ousted.Separate reports by Oxfam and ActionAid say women's rights have improved since the October 2001 US-led invasion, particularly access to education, with 2.7 million girls now in school, according to Oxfam.

Jalil Rezayee / EPA

Afghan school girls play basketball at their school in Herat, Afghanistan on October 4. Oxfam, an international aid agency report said, gains made on women's issues in the last 10 years in Afghanistan are under serious threat, asking international allies in the war-torn country not to abandon Afghan women in a quick fix deal for peace. Some 2.7 million girls are in school, compared to only a few thousand during Taliban rule, while other areas have shown patchy progress, Oxfam said.

Jalil Rezayee / EPA

An Afghan school girl writes on the black board during her class at a school in Herat, Afghanistan on October 4. Oxfam, an international aid agency report said, gains made on women's issues in the last 10 years in Afghanistan are under serious threat, asking international allies in the war-torn country not to abandon Afghan women in a quick fix deal for peace. Some 2.7 million girls are in school, compared to only a few thousand during Taliban rule, while other areas have shown patchy progress, Oxfam said.

Adek Berry / AFP - Getty Images

An Afghan child learns Koran at an Islamic school in Kabul on September 4.

 For more images of the conflict in Afghanistan click here to see the slideshow.