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Covering the streets of Lima in purple and gold

Enrique Castro-Mendivil / Reuters

Women carry incense during the procession of Peru's most revered Catholic religious icon, the "Lord of the Miracles", in central Lima October 19, 2011. The procession, which draws the largest gathering of believers on the continent, can be traced to the colonial era in which an Angolan slave drew the image of a black Jesus Christ on the walls of a hut in the plantation of Pachacamila, near Lima.

Enrique Castro-Mendivil / Reuters

Believers dressed in purple carry a painting of the "Lord of Miracles," Peru's most revered Catholic religious icon, in a major procession through central Lima October 19, 2011. The procession, which draws the largest gathering of believers on the continent, can be traced to the colonial era in which an Angolan slave drew the image of a black Jesus Christ on the walls of a hut in the plantation of Pachacamila, near Lima.

Every October thousands participate in the procession of the "Señor de los Milagros" in Lima, Peru. The two-day procession takes Catholic penitents dressed in purple and gold through the streets of Lima, following the mural of the "Lord of Miracles," as it is carried on the shoulders of over a dozen men. The mural, painted by a black slave in the 17th century, depicts the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. It was one of the few things left standing after a powerful earthquake that struck the area in 1967.

In Peru, the month of October is marked by the colors purple and gold. Many shops will decorate their stores with those colors as part of celebrations. There is even a traditional dessert, turrón de Doña Pepa, found in all the bakeries throughout the month.

Enrique Castro-Mendivil / Reuters

A believer cries while watching Peru's most revered Catholic religious icon, the "Lord of the Miracles", during a major procession through central Lima October 19, 2011. The procession, which draws the largest gathering of believers on the continent, can be traced to the colonial era in which an Angolan slave drew the image of a black Jesus Christ on the walls of a hut in the plantation of Pachacamila, near Lima.

Enrique Castro-Mendivil / Reuters

Believers carry the "Lord of Miracles" painting, Peru's most revered Catholic religious icon, in a major procession through central Lima October 19, 2011. The procession, which draws the largest gathering of believers on the continent, can be traced to the colonial era in which an Angolan slave drew the image of a black Jesus Christ on the walls of a hut in the plantation of Pachacamila, near Lima.