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Aftermath of the October snowstorm

Seth Wenig / AP

A women steps over downed tree limbs while walking her dog in Central Park in New York, Monday, Oct. 31, 2011. The group that manages Central Park estimates that the New York City park may lose 1,000 trees due to the unprecedented weekend snowstorm.

It was surreal to see the blizzard conditions that took over New York City and much of the East Coast on Saturday, as well as the resulting damage from the heavy snow on trees that had not yet lost their leaves. New York City is estimating it will lose 1,000 trees. Over 1 million customers throughout the Northeast are still without power, as crews continue to struggle to get them back on the grid. For thousands of children in school, the storm brought them their first snow day of the season.

For more information: Power still out for millions after 'historic storm.'

Seth Wenig / AP

Trees that were damaged by a snowstorm, then trimmed, stand bare of branches at the edge of Central Park in New York, Monday, Oct. 31, 2011. The group that manages Central Park estimates that the New York City park may lose 1,000 trees due to the unprecedented weekend snowstorm.

Jessica Hill / AP

A worker from Connecticut Light & Power inspects a downed power line on Route 5 in South Windsor, Conn., Monday, Oct. 31, 2011. The unseasonably early nor'easter had utility companies struggling to restore electricity to more than 3 million homes and businesses.

Jessica Hill / AP

Workers from the Connecticut Department of Transportation remove a traffic signal that had fall from a downed line on Route 5 in South Windsor, Conn., Monday, Oct. 31, 2011. The unseasonably early nor'easter had utility companies struggling to restore electricity to more than 3 million homes and businesses.