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NY exhibit pays homage to documentary photographers

Ruth Orkin / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a 1948 gelatin silver print taken by Ruth Orkin named "Boy Jumping into Hudson River". Compelling portraits of everyday life drawn from the streets of New York City form the heart of a new exhibit opening on November 4, 2011 at The Jewish Museum.

Sol Prom / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a gelatin silver print taken by Sol Prom (Solomon Fabricant) named "Dancing School".

Sid Grossman / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a 1947 gelatin silver print taken by Sid Grossman named "Coney Island".

Arthur Leipzig / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a gelatin silver print taken by Arthur Leipzig named "Chalk Games".

Tosh Matsumoto / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a c. 1950 gelatin silver print taken by Tosh Matsumoto named "Untitled".

Arthur Leipzig / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a 1946 gelatin silver print taken by Arthur Leipzig named "Ideal Laundry".

Alexander Alland / The Jewish Museum via Reuters

A handout photo shows a 1938 gelatin silver print taken by Alexander Alland named "Brooklyn Bridge".

Reuters reports:

"The Radical Camera: New York's Photo League, 1936-1951," recognizes the role that the League played in the evolution of the documentary photograph.

The League's photographers captured public and private moments: tenement balconies full of people angling for a good view of a passing parade, a woman gazing at a Bleecker Street bakery window, a solitary walker on the Brooklyn Bridge, swing dancers in Harlem. Some images are beautiful; some stark. Many comment subtly on class, race, and disparities of opportunity.

  • Read the full story here.
  • Find out more about the exhibit here.