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Occupy Wall Street protesters no longer camping overnight at Zuccotti Park

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

An Occupy Wall Street protester rests in Zuccotti Park a day after it was cleared of the Occupy Wall Street camp in an early morning police raid on November 16, 2011 in New York city. Hundreds of protesters, who rallied against economic inequality in America, have slept in tents and under tarps since Sept. 17 in Zuccotti Park. A New York judge ruled Tuesday that the protesters could return to Zuccotti Park but couldn't set up tents or sleep in the park. Zuccotti Park became the epicenter of the global Occupy Wall Street movement.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

People walk by Zuccotti Park a day after it was cleared of Occupy Wall Street protesters in an early morning police raid on November 16, in New York city.

Seth Wenig / AP

A private security guard talks with an Occupy Wall Street protester laying on the ground in Zuccotti Park in New York, on Wednesday, Nov. 16. The Occupy Wall Street encampment is gone, but the movement lives on. What nobody knows is just how long it can survive without a place to call home after police hauled away demonstators in a late night raid.

Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Occupy Wall Street protesters sleep on the floor at Judson Church on November 16, 2011 in New York City. Since camping is now banned in Zuccotti park, protesters had to seek out alternate locations.

While the ranks of the Occupy Wall Street protesters have thinned since the raid early Tuesday morning the remaining protesters show resolve: 'You can't evict an idea whose time has come'. Click here for the full story.

 See more images from the Occupy Wall Street movement here.