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Thanksgiving fare goes multi-legged at insectarium

Gerald Herbert / AP

Stephanie Smith, an educator at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans, holds a plate of boiled mealworms, left, and a cornbread stuffing with mealworms, for visitors to sample Thanksgiving-inspired foods with insects at the Audubon Insectarium Friday, Nov. 11, 2011.

Gerald Herbert / AP

Zack Lemann, visitor programs manager at the Audubon Insectarium in New Orleans, and Stephanie Smith, an educator at the bug museum, prepare cranberry sauce with wax worms, cricket pumpkin pie, and turkey with cornbread and mealworm stuffing for visitors to sample Thanksgiving-inspired foods with insects.

Would you try this at home?

AP reports:

Gerald Herbert / AP

Cornbread stuffing with mealworms.

Anyone who wants can try this at home, said Zack Lemann, the museum's visitor program manager. "These particular recipes follow an old adage for beginning bug chefs: if a recipe calls for small bits or chopped pieces of fruits, vegetables, nuts, or meat, you can add or substitute insects," he said.

So just take a favorite recipe and add bugs, making sure they've been raised in a pesticide-free environment. "Mealworms are usually boiled for a good 10 minutes. Wax worms are simmered for only three minutes or so. The softer body of wax worms will burst if boiled for too long, so we use less heat and less time when cooking them," he wrote in an email.

"Crickets are done at 350 for 30 minutes and stirred into the pie mix."

Read the full story here.

 

Gerald Herbert / AP

Corinne Hufft of Dallas, feeds her daughter Ella Hufft, 3, a boiled mealworm.