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Honoring Martin Luther King Jr. at his memorial in DC

Evan Vucci / AP

From left, Liza Joy Marcato of Hillsdale, N.Y., Beverly Steed of Washington, and Marcus Knausenberger of Devin, Pa., sing after a ceremony at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, on Jan. 16.

Many gathered this morning at the new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial along the National Mall. The memorial opened in August and features many quotations from the legendary civil rights leader. One of the quotes inscribed on a stone wall is being corrected after many complaints that the abridged version of the quote did not accurately reflect King's words. For more information, see the video at the end of the post.

AP reports:

Some gaze upon this figure in silence. Some smile and pull out cell phone cameras. Others chat about how closely the statue resembles King. And some are moved to tears.

"Just all that this man did so that we could do anything and be anything," said Brandolyn Brown, 26, of Cheraw, South Carolina, who visited the memorial Saturday with her aunt and cousin.

"I know it took a lot more than him to get to where we are, but he was a big part of the movement."

Read the full story.

 

Evan Vucci / AP

People gather at sunrise at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington,on Jan. 16, for a ceremony to mark his legacy. The Washington Monument is at center.

Evan Vucci / AP

Angelique Marcus of Baltimore, Md. touches a quote on the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, on Jan. 16, before a ceremony to honor his legacy.

Evan Vucci / AP

Sandra Everett of Springdale, Md., left, and her granddaughter Jada Shepherd, 7, of Springdale, Md., look up at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, on Jan. 16, before a ceremony to honor his legacy.

A quote included on the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial is being corrected after questions of its accuracy and context arose. The Grio's Jeff Johnson discusses the controversy.