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Year of the Dragon is welcomed in China and beyond

Diego Azubel / EPA

Actors perform the dragon dance on the eve of the New Year of the Dragon at a park in Beijing, China, Jan. 22. On Jan. 23, Chinese around the globe will mark the start of the Spring Festival, or Chinese New Year of the Dragon according the 12-year Chinese cycle of zodiac animals.

Edgar Su / Reuters

People rush to place joss sticks at the Guan Yin temple in Singapore, Jan. 23. Worshippers gather annually at the temple on the eve of the Lunar New Year with hopes to be the first person to offer joss sticks when the clock strikes midnight, believed to bring prosperity and luck.

Diego Azubel / EPA

An actor takes a break outside the changing room prior to his performance on the eve of the New Year of the Dragon at a park in Beijing, China, Jan. 22. On Jan. 23, Chinese around the globe will mark the start of the Spring Festival, or Chinese New Year of the Dragon according the 12 year Chinese cycle of zodiac animals.

Pedro Ugarte / AFP - Getty Images

People buy flowers at the Flower Market to decorate their homes on the eve of the Lunar New Year of the Dragon in Hong Kong on Jan. 22. The Chinese New Year is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. Flowers are said to give good luck and are given when visiting family for the traditional New Years Eve feast.

Ilya Naymushin / Reuters

An amateur artist breathes fire during celebrations for the Chinese Lunar New Year in Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk Jan. 22.

Ilya Naymushin / Reuters

Amateur artists perform a fire show to celebrate the Chinese new year in Russia's Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk, Jan. 22.

Carlos Barria / Reuters

A boy watches fireworks as part of Chinese new year celebrations in Shanghai, China, Jan. 22.

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