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Honoring the victims of the Holocaust 67 years after the liberation of Auschwitz

Bela Szandelszky / AP

Holocaust survivor Eva Szirtes pays respect to relatives at a memorial wall bearing the engraved names of tens of thousands of victims of the Nazi Holocaust at the Holocaust Memorial Center, during Holocaust remembrance day in Budapest, Hungary, on Jan. 27. The remembrance day marks the day of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camps 67 years ago.

Jim Hollander / EPA

A visitor to the 'Hall of Names' in the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem, Jan. 27. The room holds 600 portraits of individual Jews who perished at the hands of the Nazis during the Holocaust of World War II and contains binders documenting more than 4,000,000 of those people. Today marks International Holocaust Remembrance Day on this day in 1945 that the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp was liberated by Soviet forces.

John Mcconnico / AP

A man smells a flower during the Holocaust remembrance memorial in Chisinau, Moldova on Jan. 27. The remembrance day marks the day of the liberation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camps 67 years ago.

AP reports:

It's a huge question for observant Jews: How can one still believe in a merciful God after suffering through the worst genocide in history?

As the world marks Holocaust Remembrance Day on Friday, members of Israel's most devout group will remember the victims with prayer, study of scripture and a deep conviction in a grand plan that is beyond their earthly comprehension.

Many notable survivors, including Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel, have famously questioned where God was during the Holocaust. But survivors from the insular ultra-Orthodox community say they felt a divine presence even in the worst places imaginable.

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