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Take your passion to the grave in a Crazy Coffin

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Visitors photograph various custom designed coffins, during the "Death - Festival for the Living" exhibit, at the Royal Festival Hall in London, on Jan. 28. Crazy Coffins, an offshoot of a Nottingham-based traditional coffin and urn maker which took on a new identity in the 1990s when people began asking to customize their final resting places, presents uncanny coffins as part of the exhibit. The "Death - Festival for the Living" exhibit is open from Jan. 20-29.

If you're wondering how much a Crazy Coffin will set you back, the Nottingham, England based company's site offers the following on their pricing:

A coffin shaped like a particular motor car may set you back four or five thousand pounds. But a simplified football boot may cost you only eight hundred pounds.

Crazy Coffins has yet to fill an order outside the United Kingdom, but waits in anticipation to do so:

The time between death and the funeral is sometimes short and can prohibit an order from abroad. A better idea is to buy now and die later!

Learn more about their work: Crazy Coffins

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Visitors look at a sled coffin made for Richard Mullard. Mullard plans to be buried wearing his skis and commissioned this replica of a Laplanders sled, with boots to fit, so that his funeral resembles a final expedition to the frozen north.

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Visitors listen to a talk by former Concord engineer Malcolm Brocklhurst, top right, as they look at his airplane coffin.

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Railway enthusiast Brian Holden, 83, poses for a photograph with the Orient Express Railway Carriage coffin he commissioned.

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Visitors look at a corkscrew shaped coffin.

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Visitors look at a ballet shoe shaped coffin commissioned by ballet fan Pat Cox.