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Mashco-Piro Indian tribe's survival threatened in Peru

Diego Cortijo / Survival International via AFP - Getty Images

A photo released by the Survival International organization on Jan. 31, 2012 of what they describe as being uncontacted members of a family from the Mashco-Piro tribe somewhere in the southeastern Peruvian jungle. According to Survival International, illegal logging displaces the indians from their homes.

Gabriella Galli / AFP - Getty Images

A photo released by the Survival International organization on Jan. 31 of what they describe as being members of the Mashco-Piro tribe near the Manu National Park in the southeastern Peruvian jungle. According to Survival International, illegal logging displaces the indians from their homes.

 AP Reports:

LIMA, Peru — Peruvian authorities say they are struggling to keep outsiders away from a clan of previously isolated Amazon Indians who began appearing on the banks of a jungle river popular with environmental tourists last year.

The behavior of the small group of Mashco-Piro Indians has puzzled scientists, who say it may be related to the encroachment of loggers and by low-flying aircraft from nearby natural gas and oil exploration in the southeastern region of the country.

Clan members have been blamed for two bow-and-arrow attacks on people near the riverbank in Madre de Dios state where officials say the Indians were first seen last May.

Click here to read more on how pressure from loggers may be threatening the Mashco-Piro Indian's survival.

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