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Mind the gap: London's tube gets spruced up for the Olympics

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Commuters travel in a carriage on a London Underground train on March 5, in London, England. London's underground rail system, commonly called the tube, is the oldest of its kind in the world dating back to 1890. It carries approximately a quarter of a million people around its network every day along its 249 miles of track and 270 stations. The network has undergone several years of upgrade work and refurbishment in preparation for the Olympic Games which take place this summer. During this time the tube is expected to carry millions of visitors to and from the Olympic Parks.

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A train moves along a platform at an Underground station on February 28, 2012 in London, England.

Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

Commuters make their way on the escalator at Angel underground station on March 5, in London, England.

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A commuter makes his way through an underground tube station on February 14, in London, England.

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A conductor signals the departure of a train at an Underground station on March 5 in London, England.

Dan Kitwood / Getty Images

A general view of the Gloucester Road Underground sign on February 28, in London, England.

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From Wimbledon to Wembley Stadium to The Dome, a look at the venues for the 2012 London Olympic Games.

  London's underground rail system, commonly called the tube, is the oldest of its kind in the world dating back to 1890. It carries approximately a quarter of a million people around its network every day along its 249 miles of track and 270 stations. The network has undergone several years of upgrade work and refurbishment in preparation for the Olympic Games which take place this summer. During this time the tube is expected to carry millions of visitors to and from the Olympic Parks.