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Scenes from the Falkland Islands, a sore subject between Britain and Argentina

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

Argentine Falklands War veterans walk among the tombstones to pay homage to Argentine soldiers who died during the conflict at Darwin cemetery, in the Falkland Islands on Sunday. Diplomatic tensions between Argentina and Britain have been rising in the runup to the 30th anniversary of the war they fought over the islands.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

Argentine Falklands War veteran Marcelo Postonia kneels down next to the cannon he used during the conflict near Port Stanley.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

Port Stanley is seen from Wireless Ridge on Monday.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

Willy Bowles directs school children to cross a street in Port Stanley on Wednesday.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

Falkland Islands' Governor Nigel Haywood pours tea into a cup during an interview with Reuters at his residence in Port Stanley on Tuesday.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

A woman shoots a video of a double-decker bus from her wheelchair in Port Stanley on Thursday.

Marcos Brindicci / Reuters

The Falkland Islands flag blows in the wind at a depot for machinery and equipment used in oil exploration is seen in Port Stanley on Tuesday. Argentina will take legal action against any companies involved in oil exploration in the Falkland Islands, Foreign Minister Hector Timerman said on Thursday.

AP reports that Argentina is intensifying its campaign to block oil development in the Falkand Islands:

"These latest attempts to damage the economic livelihoods of the Falkland Islands people regrettably reflect a pattern of behavior by the Argentine government," Britain's Foreign Office said Thursday. "From harassing Falklands shipping to threatening the islanders' air links with Chile, Argentina's efforts to intimidate the Falklands are illegal, unbecoming and wholly counterproductive."

British Prime Minister David Cameron said in New York Thursday that he had discussed the conflict with U.S. President Barack Obama the day before — and that the U.S. clearly supports the status quo.

"I wanted to stress how important it is for Britain to set out how clearly we support the right of the Falkland Islanders to determine their own future. They want to remain with us and that is very clear," Cameron said as he wrapped up a U.S. visit.