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Syrian rebel groups create formal alliance, but still depend on homemade weapons

AFP - Getty Images

A member of the Free Syrian Army looks through binoculars at a camp in the mountains near the village of Janudieh in the northern province of Idlib on March 18. The head of the rebel Free Syrian Army, Riad al-Asaad, announced on March 24 the formation of a military council grouping all rebel chiefs, including Syria's most senior army deserter General Mustafa al-Sheikh.

AFP - Getty Images

A defected Syrian soldier, now a member of the Free Syrian Army, displays a homemade nail bomb at a mountain outpost near the village of Janudieh in the northern province of Idlib on March 18.

There have been many news reports on the Syrian rebels' plea to the international community for weapons to help their fight against President Bashar Assad and his forces. These images provide a good look at the informal weaponry they are dependent upon today. Recently, photojournalist Rodrigo Abd recalled his dangerous trip to report in Syria, where the homemade grenades carried by rebels who helped them travel through the country were as nerve wracking as the bombs and bullets flying overhead.

AFP - Getty Images

A defected Syrian soldier, now a member of the Free Syrian Army (FSA), holds an improvised explosive device (IED) at a camp in the northern rebel stronghold of Idlib near the Turkish border on March 17.

International condemnation and high-level diplomacy have failed to stop the year-old Syria crisis, which the U.N. says has killed more than 8,000 people, many of them civilian protesters.

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