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Arrows fly as 'Hunger Games' proves good for business

By Sarah Max, Entrepreneur.com

Any time a bow and arrow play a prominent role in a Hollywood hit (think Braveheart, Lord of the Rings or Avatar) the 29-year-old Lancaster Archery Supply in Lancaster, Pa., gets a bump in business.

Charles Sykes / AP

Garrett Chamberlain participates in the youth archery league at Targeteers Archery in Saddle Brook, N.J on April 13, 2012. In schools and backyards, for their birthdays and out with their dads, kids are gaga for archery a month after the release of "The Hunger Games."

 

Charles Sykes / AP

Christa Mattessich, 7, retrieves her arrows after a round in the youth archery league at Targeteers Archery in Saddle Brook, N.J. Archery ranges around the country have enjoyed a steady uptick among kids of both sexes in the movie's lead-up, though 16-year-old heroin Katniss Everdeen, the archery ace seems to resonate with girls more than boys.

But this time, in the four weeks since the The Hunger Games hit the big screen, the 55-employee distributor and manufacturer of target archery equipment has seen sales increase in a “profound way,” says President Robert Kaufold, who chalks it up to tweens and teens interested in emulating the sharp-shooting heroine Katniss Everdeen.

Charles Sykes / AP

Nicole Donzella of Fair Lawn, N.J., 15, participates in the youth archery league at Targeteers Archery in Saddle Brook.

Indeed, the story has proven a fertile ground for entrepreneurs. Penned by Suzanne Collins, the plot involves a life-or-death game show in the post-apocalyptic future, where “tributes” from one of a dozen “districts” are pitted against the elements and each other. Full Story

Scholastic Books' David Levithan, who edited the infamous "Hunger Games," talks about the franchise's success.

Murray Close / Lionsgate Films

Jennifer Lawrence portrays Katniss Everdeen in "The Hunger Games."

 

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