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Oklahoma City honors victims of bombing 17 years later

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Bagpiper Kevin M. Donnelly stands at attention during the 17th annual Remembrance Ceremony at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, in Oklahoma City, on April 19.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

A Housing and Urban Development employee places flowers on the chairs of bombing victims who worked for HUD, in the Field of Chairs at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum before the start of the 17th annual remembrance ceremony in Oklahoma City on April 19.

 

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Bagpiper Kevin M. Donnelly marches past the Field of Chairs during the ceremony at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum on April 19.

The 17th annual Remembrance Ceremony was held on April 19 at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, in Oklahoma City, Okla. Timothy McVeigh was convicted on federal murder charges for the 1995 deadly bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building and was executed in 2001. The bombing was the deadliest terrorist attack on U.S. soil before the 9/11 attacks.

April 19, 1995: NBC News covers  the worst domestic terrorism attacks the country had ever seen. Fifteen years later, viewers will hear Timothy McVeigh's chilling confession in his own words for the first time.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Carlos and Renee Moore, the brother and mother of Oklahoma City bombing victim Antonio Ansara Cooper Jr., read a portion of the list of 168 names of the victims during the 17th annual Remembrance Ceremony at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum in Oklahoma City on April 19.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Albert Ashwood, left, and his wife Cindy Ashwood, right, attach a picture of Cindy's sister, Susan Jane Ferrell, to Ferrell's chair in the Field of Chairs at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, on April 19.

MSNBC's Rachel Maddow narrates 2010 documentary about Timothy McVeigh

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