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Tombs mark lost loved ones at pet cemetery

John Moore / Getty Images

Grieving pet owner Spencer Warren opens the casket of his beloved 12-year-old beagle-hound Justin in the viewing room of the Hartsdale Pet Cemetery and Crematory on April 30 in Hartsdale, New York. Warren, an Annandale, Virginia attorney, had traveled with Justin's body to bury him here on a shady hillside. The cemetery, established in 1896, is the oldest pet cemetery in the United States and serves as the final resting place for tens of thousands of pets. Pet owners can spend as much as $20,000 for a large plot to bury multiple pets and as little as $300-400 for small plots to bury ashes if they choose cremation. Pet owners also have the option of eventually having their own ashes buried in the plot, alongside their pets.

John Moore / Getty Images

Pet chaplain David James conducts a graveside service for Justin, a twelve-year-old beagle-hound at the Hartsdale Pet Cemetery and Crematory.

John Moore / Getty Images

Graves and tombs mark pets' final resting place at the Hartsdale Pet Cemetery and Crematory.

John Moore / Getty Images

Maddalena Sullivan visits a grave on the two-month anniversary of the death of her cat Spanky.

John Moore / Getty Images

A gravestone marks a pet's final resting place.

See more images of pets in PhotoBlog, and animals of all kinds in Animal Tracks

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