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T-Rex and friends ready for their debut at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

Michael Stravato / AP

In a May 15, 2012 photo paleontologists from the Black Hills Institute of Geologic Research with the help of film industry prop artists install a T-Rex fossil skeleton in the new Hall of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science Tuesday. The $85 million wing of the museum will have the only Triceratops skin found to date and a unique T-rex fossil with complete hands. The exhibit opens June 2.

Michael Stravato / AP

Director Pete Larson of the Black Hills Institute of Geologic Research, back, and artist Tomas Schneider, right, attach a Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil head into place in the new Hall of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science Tuesday. The $85 million wing of the museum will have the only Triceratops skin found to date and a unique T-rex fossil with complete hands.

Michael Stravato / AP

Robert Bakker, curator of paleontology, shows a fossil of a Ichthyosaur and unborn pups that will be on display in the new Hall of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. The $85 million wing of the museum that opens June 2 will have the only Triceratops skin found to date and a unique Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil with complete hands.

Michael Stravato / AP

Workers finish the new Hall of Paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. The $85 million wing of the museum will have the only Triceratops skin found to date and a unique T-rex fossil with complete hands.

 From AP:  Pups in her womb, a large eye visible behind the rib cage, one baby stuck in the birth canal: all fossilized evidence that this ancient marine beast, the Ichthyosaur, died in childbirth.

Jurassic Mom's almost certainly painful death is perfectly preserved in a rare fossil skeleton, one of the many unique items that will go on display in the Houston Museum of Natural Science's $85 million dinosaur hall when it opens to the public June 2. The Associated Press got a first peek at the exhibit as the finishing touches were put in place.

Paleontologists and scientists at the museum and the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in Hill City, S.D. have worked tirelessly for three years to collect, clean and preserve artifacts designed to give visitors a look at how life evolved beginning 25 billion years ago.

"You'll actually be able to touch a fossil that's 3.5 billion years old," Robert Bakker, the museum's curator of paleontology, says in a conspiratorial whisper. "A microbe, simpler than bacteria, which had in its DNA the kernel that would flower later on into dinosaurs, mammals, then us. That's the beginning of the safari."

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