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China's Three Gorges Dam proves onerous

A fisherman walks with his catch on the banks of the Yangtze River, near the Three Gorges dam, in Yichang, Hubei province, China, Aug. 9, 2012.

Carlos Barria, Reuters — China relocated 1.3 million people during the 17 years it took to complete the Three Gorges dam. Even after finishing the $59 billion project last month, the threat of landslides along the dam's banks will force tens of thousands to move again. The dam is a reminder of the social and environmental challenges that have dogged the world's largest hydroelectric project. While there has been little protest among residents who will be relocated a second time, the environmental fallout over other big investments in China has become a hot-button issue ahead of a leadership transition this year.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: these images were received on Aug. 22.

Ma Tianxin examines the cracked walls of his home after a landslide near Badong, on the bank of the Yangtze River, 62 miles from the Three Gorges dam, in Hubei province, China, Aug. 7.

Ships sail on the Yangtze River near Badong, 62 miles from the Three Gorges dam, in Hubei province, China, Aug. 7.

A woman walks past a building under demolition at a residential area to be relocated, Huangtupo, Badong city, 62 miles from the Three Gorges dam, in Hubei province, China, Aug. 8.

A laborer walks through a construction site where houses will be raised for relocated people in Badong, near the banks of the Yangtze River, 62 miles from the Three Gorges dam in Hubei province, China, Aug. 7.

See more photos from China

A man washes his hands next to a ship, on the banks of the Yangtze River, in Fengjie, 105 miles from the Three Gorges dam, Chongqing province, China, Aug. 7.

A man fishes in the Yangtze River near the Three Gorges dam in Yichang, Hubei province, Aug. 9.

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