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Protesters clash with cops near US Embassy in Cairo

Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters

Protesters throw stones at riot policemen during clashes along a road leading to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, on September 14, 2012.

Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters

Riot policemen collect stones during clashes with protesters in Cairo on September 14, 2012.

Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters

Protesters run as riot policemen clear Tahrir Square and a road leading to the U.S. embassy in Cairo on September 14, 2012.

Ed Giles / Getty Images Contributor

A protester throws a rock toward riot police during clashes near the U.S. Embassy and Tahrir Square on September 14, 2012 in Cairo.

Ed Giles / Getty Images Contributor

A boy who was overcome by the effects of tear gas is carried away in Cairo on September 14, 2012. Over two hundred people have been injured in clashes between protesters and security forces.

Updated at 7:25 a.m. ET: NBC News staff and wire reports — Egyptian protesters angry at a film offending the Prophet Muhammad hurled stones at police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Friday, as American missions across the Arab world and beyond tightened security in expectation of anti-U.S. demonstrations on the Muslim day of prayer.

Why films and cartoons of Muhammad spark violence

"God is greatest" and "There is no god but God," one group near the front of the clashes chanted, as police in riot gear fired tear gas and threw stones back in a street leading from the fortified embassy to nearby Tahrir Square, the locus point of massive demonstrations that led to the ouster of pro-American dictator Hosni Mubarak last year.

NYT: Egypt leaders caught in the middle in anti-US protests

The Islamist group the Muslim Brotherhood said on Twitter that it was canceling its call for nationwide protests, but that it would still be present in Tahrir Square "for a symbolic protest against the movie." Read the full story.

Protests that led to the deaths of the U.S. Ambassador in Libya and three other Americans at the consulate in Benghazi spread across the region. NBC's Richard Engel in Egypt and NBC's Ayman Mohyeldin in Libya report on what might have triggered the attacks and the United States' history in the region.

Zoubeir Souissi / Reuters

Protests that led to the deaths of the U.S. Ambassador in Libya and three other Americans at the consulate in Benghazi spread across the region, ignited by a controversial film that ridicules Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

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