Discuss as:

At $50 a cup, you'll never forget your first elephant dung coffee

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

A Thai elephant and a mahout (the keeper and rider of an elephant) walk along the field at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on Dec. 10, 2012 in Golden Triangle, northern Thailand. The resort is the production site for Black Ivory Coffee, a brew made from beans plucked from elephant dung.

The AP reports: 

In the lush hills of northern Thailand, a herd of 20 elephants is excreting some of the world's most expensive coffee.

Trumpeted as earthy in flavor and smooth on the palate, the exotic new brew is made from beans eaten by Thai elephants and plucked a day later from their dung. A gut reaction inside the elephant creates what its founder calls the coffee's unique taste.

Stomach turning or oddly alluring, this is not just one of the world's most unusual specialty coffees. At $1,100 per kilogram ($500 per pound), it's also among the world's priciest. Full Story

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

A mahout's wives pick out coffee beans from elephant dung at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on Dec. 9.

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

A mahout's wives pick out coffee beans from elephant dung at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on Dec. 10.

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

The children of a mahout play with an elephant next to elephant dung containing coffee beans at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on Dec. 9.

Paula Bronstein / Getty Images

Thai elephants head to the river for an early morning bath at an elephant camp at the Anantara Golden Triangle resort on Dec. 10.

Ripened coffee cherries are fed to elephants on a reserve in Thailand where the excreted beans are roasted into 'Black Ivory' coffee. TODAY.com's Dara Brown reports.

Also on PhotoBlog:

Sign up for the NBCNews.com Photos Newsletter