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'Hands off' say Cypriot protesters to EU bailout plan

Filip Singer / EPA

Protesters rally against an EU bailout deal in front of the Cyprus parliament in Nicosia on March 18.

Patrick Baz / AFP - Getty Images

Cypriots show their palms reading "No" during a protest against an EU bailout deal outside the parliament in Nicosia on March 18. Cyprus's parliament has postponed until Tuesday a session to vote on the bailout deal that slaps a levy on all Cypriot bank savings, as negotiators scrambled to soften the blow for small deposit holders.

Yiannis Kourtoglou / AFP - Getty Images

A man holds a banner against German Chancellor Angela Merkel's call for Cyprus to follow economic reforms.

By John W. Schoen, NBC News

The explosive backlash to the latest European bailout – this one for tiny Cyprus – will have limited impact on U.S. consumers, businesses and investors.

But the aftershocks are a potent reminder than the ongoing European crisis – relatively dormant in recent months – is far from over.

The latest $13 billion chapter in the Europe’s efforts to reverse the economic free fall of its most heavily indebted members came with a nasty, surprise kicker. Read full story.

Patrick Baz / AFP - Getty Images

Cypriots protest outside the parliament building in Nicosia, on March 18.

Yorgos Karahalis / Reuters

Protesters shout slogans during an anti-bailout rally outside the parliament in Nicosia on March 18.