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Swiss-born WWII spy is honored with Arlington burial

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Savana Joyeuse, granddaughter of Dr. Rene Joyeuse, and other family members attend Joyeuse's burial service at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., March 29.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The family of Dr. Rene Joyeuse attend his burial service at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., March 29. In the wheelchair is Joyeuse' widow, Suzanne Joyeuse, with their son's Marc Joyeuse, and Remi Joyeuse, right.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

The remains of Dr. Rene Joyeuse, of Saranac Lake, New York, a decorated Swiss-born WWII spy, during burial services at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., March 29.

By Chris Carola / Associated Press 

When Dr. Rene Joyeuse's request for burial at Arlington National Cemetery was rejected, the family of the decorated Swiss-born World War II spy launched a campaign to get the decision reversed. Months later, Joyeuse is getting his wish, thanks in part to the involvement of the nation's top covert operators, including CIA Director David Petraeus.

Before resigning amid a sex scandal last November, Petraeus played a key role in convincing Pentagon officials that Joyeuse, a retired doctor from upstate New York, deserved to lie in rest among some of America's greatest military heroes, people familiar with the situation told The Associated Press.

"It got attention at the highest levels, very high up. That's how important he (Joyeuse) was," said Charles Pinck, president of the OSS Society, whose membership includes a dwindling number of veterans of the Office of Strategic Services, the nation's World War II intelligence agency and forerunner of the CIA.  Continue reading.