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Reunion, remembrance at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in DC

Charles Dharapak / AP

Audience members comprising of Holocaust survivors, veterans, and family members stand during a moment of silence in a tent sent up across from the museum for the 20th anniversary of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., April 29.

Charles Dharapak / AP

World War II veterans stand as they are recognized for their service at the 20th anniversary of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., April 29.

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Holocaust survivor Romana Strochlitz Primus, center, of New London, Connecticut, whose father Sigmund Strochlitz was the chairman of the museum's Contents Committee, becomes emotional during the 20th anniversary National Tribute at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum April 29, in Washington, D.C. The Museum was hosting a two-day tribute event to honor Holocaust survivors and World War II veterans to mark its 20th anniversary.

Gary Cameron / Reuters

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton applauds 90-year-old WWII veteran and concentration camp liberator Scottie Ooton, left, as Ooton accepts the commendation medal during a ceremony commemorating the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., April 29.

Elderly survivors of the Holocaust and the veterans who helped liberate them gathered in Washington, D.C. for what could be their last big reunion at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. Former President Bill Clinton and Holocaust activist and writer Elie Wiesel were present, along with 1,000 others to mark the 20th anniversary of the museum's opening. 

Since the museum's opening in 1993, it has had more than 30 million visitors. In addition to providing resources for survivors and educating the public, it partnered with Ancestry.com to begin creating an online archive of the museum's 170 million documents which will be searchable through the World Memory Project.