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High above NYC, peregrine falcon chicks get tagged before they can fly the coop

Richard Drew / AP

Wildlife biologist Chris Nadareski, foreground, of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, assisted by Port Authority structural specialist Pete Mizialko, holds one of four peregrine falcon chicks for banding, at a nest at the east tower of the George Washington Bridge, over the Hudson River, in New York, Tuesday, May 21.

Richard Drew / AP

The mother of four baby peregrine falcons guards her nest and chicks at the east tower of the George Washington Bridge, over the Hudson River, in New York, Tuesday, May 21.

Richard Drew / AP

Wildlife biologist Chris Nadareski, of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, examines one of four peregrine falcons he banded, at a nest at the east tower of the George Washington Bridge, over the Hudson River, in New York, Tuesday, May 21.

Richard Drew / AP

The mother of four baby peregrine falcons takes off from the George Washington Bridge, over the Hudson River, in New York, Tuesday, May 21.

Four peregrine falcon chicks, born three weeks ago atop the George Washington Bridge in Manhattan, were fitted with their official tracking bands on Tuesday, before they are old enough to fly the coop. Their specially built nesting box is located just six feet below the bridge’s lower level and high above the Hudson River.  Their parents are among 20 pairs of peregrine falcons living in New York City.  Full story