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Violent scenes as Brazil erupts in overnight protests

Nelson Antoine / AP

Demonstrators wave their country's national flag on Paulista Avenue where crowds gathered to celebrate the reversal of a fare hike on public transportation, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on June 20. 2013. President Dilma Rousseff called an emergency meeting of her top Cabinet members for Friday morning, more than a week after the protests began. But the protests that raged across Brazil late Thursday and into Friday were spiked with violence as people vented anger over a litany of complaints, from high taxes to corruption to rising prices.

Oliver Weiken / EPA

Several hundred thousand Brazilians attend a protest against against corruption and price hikes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Christophe Simon / AFP - Getty Images

A frightened woman runs away as policemen from the anti-riot special unit 'Trope de choque' shoot tear gas during clashes downtown Niteroi. Brazil, late on June 19, 2013.

Victor R. Caivano / AP

Military police detain a man during an anti-government protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Christophe Simon / AFP - Getty Images

A demonstrator is shot by rubber bullets as anti riot police officers charge after clashes erupted during a protest against corruption and price hikes, on June 20, 2013, in Rio de Janeiro.

Oliver Weiken / EPA

Brazilian protesters beg to enter a gas station to seek shelter from charging riot policemen (not seen) during riots following a demonstration joined by hundreds of thousands in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Victor R. Caivano / AP

Protesters gesture to riot police as they stand in front of a burning barricade during an anti-government protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Felipe Dana / AP

Protesters drag a portable toilet to add to a burning barricade during an anti-government demonstration in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Ricardo Moraes / Reuters

A demonstrator chases vandals during a protest against the Confederations Cup and the government of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Recife City, Brazil, on June 20, 2013.

Evaristo Sa / AFP - Getty Images

A couple walks in a fountain in front of riot policemen during a protest of what is now called the 'Tropical Spring' against corruption and price hikes, at National Congress in Brasilia, on June 20, 2013.

Nelson Antoine / AP

A hike in bus fares sparked protests expressing anger over government spending at the perceived expense of social programs.

A popular backlash against Brazil's nationwide protests took hold on Friday after widespread rioting overnight, as even the leftist group at the movement's core said it was done organizing marches for now because of growing discord and violence.

President Dilma Rousseff was meeting with top aides on Friday morning to figure out how to respond after more than 1 million Brazilians in over 100 cities took to the streets.

The protests blossomed over the past week, catching Rousseff and other politicians off guard as Brazilians vented anger over issues from corruption and poor public transport to billions of dollars being spent to host the soccer World Cup next year.

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